A year’s worth of data shows just 16% of administrative civil forfeiture claims are disputed.

A batch of 2016 Land Rover Range Rover and Range Rover Sport SUVs are subject to a new recall to fix doors that could open without warning. The British luxury brand filed the recall with the NHTSA in May and the documents were published and made public last week. The problem surrounds driver-side doors that could open even after closed unexpectedly. Drivers reported no warning or indication the door opened after they closed it. The door simply unlatches, and there have been reports of the doors opening while driving.

The state discount program has put almost 4,000 ultra-clean buses and trucks onto California streets and highways.

It’s the proverbial third rail of politics: raising the gas tax. But that may be changing. Given punishing commutes and congestion, attitudes towards an increase in the gas tax and other charges on motorists are softening, according to a survey study done by the Mineta Transportation Institute at San Jose State University. The nationally conducted survey included 2,723 respondents. “Support for raising the gas tax is largely dependent on how the revenue will be spent,” says Dr. Asha Weinstein Agrawal, one of the study’s authors and Director of the Mineta Transportation Institute’s National Transportation Finance Center. “Seventy-five percent of respondents supported a 10 cent increase in the gas tax if the revenue raised is dedicated to maintenance projects, but only 40 percent support the same increase if the money is used more generally to maintain and improve the transportation system.”

 You’ve heard it many times, from automakers, the energy industry and government officials: Electric vehicles are the cars of the future, essential to the fight against climate change. Yet that grand vision may founder on something most drivers take for granted: the pit stop. Most electric cars need to be plugged in after they’ve traveled 200 to 250 miles — a much shorter distance than similarly sized gasoline vehicles can run on a full tank — and charging them can take an hour or more. What’s more, chargers are often missing in the places where people need them — like the parking lots and garages of apartment buildings, where residents have had to go to great lengths to top up their car batteries, even dangling extension cords from their balconies.