The automobile industry is constantly changing, which means rules about vehicles need to change too. The first car was introduced to the world in 1885 by Karl Friedrich Benz. It rode on three wheels, was powered by gasoline, and had no seat belts. Fast-forward to today where we race Ferrari 488 Spiders, cruise in low-riders, and coast in self-driving cars. These vehicles are faster, louder, and travel farther than the cars of yore. Therefore, it only makes sense that new safety features are implemented regularly…

In excess of nine thousand employees from Immigration and Customers Enforcement (ICE) agency in the U.S. have access to a huge license plate database. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) broke the news after obtaining thousands of pages of agency documents through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit. These documents have uncovered a database of license plate collection run by a company called Vigilant Solutions. As reported by The Verge, this database allows users to track cars against previously compiled license plate data…

U.S. regulators will ask the public if robotic cars should be allowed on streets without steering wheels or brake pedals as they try to set the first legal boundaries for their design in the world’s second largest vehicle market. The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has delayed action for 15 months on General Motors’ request to deploy a limited number vehicles on U.S. roads without steering wheels or other human controls such as a brake pedal. In GM’s petition, NHTSA will for the first time compare a vehicle in which all driving decisions are made by a computer versus a human driver. NHTSA called it “an important case of first impression,” presenting “novel and important issues.”

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles will recall 862,520 gasoline-powered vehicles in the United States that do not meet U.S. emissions standards, the Environmental Protection Agency said on Wednesday. The recall was prompted by in-use emissions investigations conducted by the EPA and in-use testing conducted by Fiat Chrysler as required by U.S. regulations, the agency said. EPA said it will continue to investigate other Fiat Chrysler vehicles that are potentially noncompliant and may become the subject of future recalls…

The 84 percent of Americans who oppose civil asset forfeiture can be forgiven for having the impression that the U.S. Supreme Court ended abusive use of this practice last month in Timbs v. Indiana when it ruled that the Excessive Fines Clause of the Eighth Amendment applies to the states. Some media hailed it as a huge victory.  But the celebration is premature…