Speed cameras are set to launch in Virginia for the first time — if only in limited form — under legislation approved by both chambers of the state General Assembly. The final version of the legislation headed for Gov. Ralph Northam‘s desk only allows for handheld speed cameras used by police officers while in highway work zones. The officer’s vehicle must have its blue flashing lights activated and there must be a warning sign of the speed camera use placed within 1,000 feet of the work zone. Similar to speed cameras in Maryland and D.C., tickets would be sent by mail and would be punishable only by fines of up to $125. Tickets would only be sent to drivers clocked at least 12 miles an hour over the speed limit.

France will invest 700 million euros ($790 million) over the next five years into projects to boost the European electric car battery industry and reduce its carmakers’ reliance on dominant Asian rivals, President Emmanuel Macron said on Wednesday.

After decades of promises, personal air vehicles are finally getting close to commercial reality—but you still probably won’t own one.

Their numbers are dwindling, but the Yellow Vest protesters continue to bedevil the government of Emmanuel Macron.

China is moving forward in the global “race to 5G,” as state-owned carrier China Mobile has announced (via Xinhua) that it’s already building the first 5G smart highway — a city-scale system of roads capable of supporting cellular network-coordinated transportation services. The infrastructure is currently under construction in Wuhan, the capital of China’s centrally located Hubei Province. As the country’s largest telecommunications company, China Mobile plans to roll out a collection of 5G services on the highway, beginning with “smart toll stations” that could do away with current toll transponders and human operators. The carrier also plans to gather real-time traffic information and make AI-assisted predictions using the data, as well as supporting autonomous cars.